How Donald Trump Shifted Kids-Cancer Charity Money Into His Business

In reviewing filings from the Eric Trump Foundation and other charities, it’s clear that the course wasn’t free–that the Trump Organization received payments for its use, part of more than $1.2 million that has no documented recipients past the Trump Organization. Golf charity experts say the listed expenses defy any reasonable cost justification for a one-day golf tournament.

Forbes

Politics & Policy – Roundup 06/07/2017

  • Democrats to sue Trump over conflicts of interest – “Dozens of House and Senate Democrats plan to sue President Donald Trump in the coming weeks, claiming he is breaking the law by refusing to relinquish ownership of his sprawling real-estate empire while it continues to profit from business with foreign governments.” It was just reported that Saudi Arabia paid the Trump Hotel $270k. That’s a heck of a hotel bill.
  • House Of Representatives Unanimously Votes To Condemn Turkish Security Attack On D.C. Protesters – “Without a single dissenting vote, the House of Representatives voted last night to condemn Turkish security forces’ attack on protesters in D.C. last month.” Talk about bipartisan. Last month a group of protesters were attached by Turkish security forces outside of the Turkish embassy in D.C. and it was caught on video.
  • Donald Trump’s presidency is an American crisis – “At the center of all this, Trump is running a chaotic and understaffed government. He has named nominees for only 80 of the 558 key appointments he needs to fill, and only 40 of them have cleared Senate confirmation. Last night brought news that Attorney General Jeff Sessions was considering resigning, and last week brought news that Trump’s communications director had been fired. Trump is tweeting out criticisms of his own Justice Department, investigators are digging into first son-in-law Jared Kushner’s contacts with Russia, and chief eldest child Ivanka Trump has wrested the cover of US Weekly for a profile focusing on her disagreements with her father. Amid all this, Trump’s approval rating is down to a miserable 38 percent.”
  • Comey Forces Trump Defenders Into Extreme and Absurd Spin – “[Republicans] reactions are revealing a profound dishonesty that far exceeds the norms of usual political spin, and are demonstrating that the Trumpified quarters of the GOP and the conservative movement are intellectually bankrupt and devoid of principle.”
  • Today’s Russia hearing — without many answers — was still bad for Trump – “Top intelligence and law enforcement officials refused to confirm reports that President Donald Trump had tried to shut down an ongoing FBI probe into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn’s ties to Russia.” But then again, they refused to answer anything.
  • What Monkeys Can Teach Us About Fairness – “The data on inequality is, of course, staggering. The top 1 percent in America owns more than the bottom 90 percent. The annual Wall Street bonus pool alone is more than the annual year-round earnings of all Americans working full time at the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, according to the Institute for Policy Studies. And what’s becoming clearer is the fraying of the social fabric that results.”

Is Trump A Fascist?

If you ask progressives on the Left, even some moderates, you will probably here an answer in the affirmative. I’ve been guilty of it–no, I won’t take it back–and will probably continue to do so if only because I feel that his brand of rule isn’t democratic, nor do I think he really cares about our democracy and institutions. It’s fairly clear from his tweets that he doesn’t hold any regard for checks and balances. Pay close a

Corey Robin, who studies Conservativism and the politics of fear, notes that:

Here’s what I learned about Fear, American Style: The worst, most terrible things that the United States has done have almost never happened through an assault on American institutions; they’ve always happened through American institutions and practices. These are the elements of the American polity that have offered especially potent tools and instruments of intimidation and coercion: federalism, the separation of powers, social pluralism, and the rule of law. All the elements of the American experience that liberals and conservatives have so cherished as bulwarks of American freedom have also been sources and instruments of political fear. In all the cases I looked at, coercion, intimidation, repression, and violence were leveraged through these mechanisms, not in spite of them.

Emphasis mine.

To explain, American Imperialism, genocide, slavery, Jim Crow, the surveillance state were allowed to happen because our institutions were set up in a way that it let it happen. Americans were the ones inflicting pain on others. The Trump era has brought a completely different kind of attack. This time our institutions are attacking the American people. This attack on institutions themselves could potentially lead to an unprecendented amount of power for Trump and his inner circle.

In How to Build An Autocracy, David Frum states

Over the past generation, we have seen ominous indicators of a breakdown of the American political system: the willingness of congressional Republicans to push the United States to the brink of a default on its national obligations in 2013 in order to score a point in budget negotiations; Barack Obama’s assertion of a unilateral executive power to confer legal status upon millions of people illegally present in the United States—despite his own prior acknowledgment that no such power existed.

Sam Wang, a neuroscientist at Princeton who developed the Princeton Election Consortium, developed a checklist to determine if the new administration is authoritarian or not. Trump has managed to check of 5/10 of them and he isn’t even a month into his term.

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Trump’s Foreign Policy

It’s been quiet on the foreign policy front as far as Trump is concerned–it’s been a few days since he threatened to attack anyone–but that doesn’t mean Trump’s foreign policy issues are going away. We need to seriously consider what has been happening both outside of the Trump administration but also inside. Most administrations surround themselves with people that are experts for a reason but Trump seems to think that’s a dumb idea. Meanwhile, Bannon thinks WWIII is going to happen. Based on his past remarks he might even be willing to start it himself. Which is scary. Really scary. Especially when you consider that Trump thinks Bannon is his man.

Experts think Trump has already messed up.

One thing we know about Iran is they don’t particularly respond well to American pressure. If we start threatening them militarily, if we start taking military action against them, that will give them an obvious incentive to try and restart their nuclear program. And that then places the United States in the position of whether or not it genuinely wants to go to war to try and prevent that. I think the Obama administration understood that that path was not the path we wanted to go down. I think we have to worry now, given the attitude of Mr. Trump and some of his closest advisers, that they actually see a conflict with Iran as being in the United States’ interest. The big problem, of course, is they also seem to want to have a conflict with almost the entire Islamic world, while at the same time getting some of the members of the Arab or Islamic world to help us with ISIS. Again, this is just an example of where their policies are deeply contradictory and, therefore, are unlikely to succeed.

President Bannon?

Leaks abound the Trump administration, which news that Trump isn’t in charge. Bannon seems to be pulling the strings and the latest leaks seem to confirm it:

But for the moment, Mr. Bannon remains the president’s dominant adviser, despite Mr. Trump’s anger that he was not fully briefed on details of the executive order he signed giving his chief strategist a seat on the National Security Council, a greater source of frustration to the president than the fallout from the travel ban.

Either Trump isn’t reading the Executive Orders he’s given, isn’t being fulling briefed on what the EO’s involve, or he isn’t being told what the implications of such orders are. All three alone are absolutely insane and amount to neglect but since most are in agreement that all three are happening then we have someone that is legitimately incapable of performing the job he was elected to do. His voters, although the minority, didn’t vote for Bannon. They voted for Trump.

Clinton Can’t Escape Obama’s Legacy

Clinton Can’t Escape Obama’s Legacy – Like him or not, Obama’s 8 years in office have been about as successful as possible. He’s implemented a health care system that’s insured millions and has made some much needed services cheaper, especially for women. His economic policies have lowered the unemployment rate. The next president has tough policy shoes to fill. Trump could potentially dismantle everything Obama fought for (everyone move to Canada!) and Hillary could bring another 4 years of Obama-ism.

Clinton’s straight talk on Trump and alt-right

Clinton’s straight talk on Trump and alt-right

Clinton depicted Trump as the rogue politician he is, one who qualitatively differs from all previous GOP nominees. Rogues (whether states or individuals) operate outside accepted norms or principles. This makes them seductive to some, even as they are a threat to most.

I’ve seen a lot of people try to deny that Donald Trump is a racist and a few posts floating around on Facebook about how the Republican party is the party of Lincoln so it (and Trump) can’t be racist. But let’s face it, Trump has a long history of making racist remarks and the GOP platform is, to say the very least, extreme and is full of anti-LGBTQ, misogynistic, and racist policy recommendations. The alt-right are just a bunch of white assholes and they’ve successfully taken over the GOP.

It’s the economy, stupid!

Trump put forth his economic plan recently. It’s definitely something. His economic advisors have turned him into Jeb Bush economically, which I guess isn’t as bad as it could be. The Upshot analyzed his plan a bit and found that the math just doesn’t add up. Trump stated that there were about 92 million Americans not working but when you break that number down you find that, while true, it isn’t quite what it seems. From The Upshot:

But the problem with that number (it actually is 94 million, if he’s referring to the Bureau of Labor Statistics number for adults not in the labor force) is that it includes a lot of people who aren’t working for good reason: They’re high school and college students; stay-at-home parents; people who are disabled; retirees.

Further, how does he plan to create jobs? Manufacturing jobs aren’t coming back, we are no longer specialized in those types of jobs and manufacturing things in the U.S. is not only more expensive but less efficient. That’s why Ford is moving small car production to Mexico. Stopping them, as Trump suggests, doesn’t make any sense from an economic stand point. Manufacturing cars in a more expensive country means those cars need to be priced higher to recoup production costs, which means less demand, which means less cars produced, which means slower production and less jobs. How can we keep manufacturing in the United States? Through automation, not people.

So if manufacturing jobs are going where will we find these magical jobs that trump wants to create? (Hint: Deregulation is not the answer.) Infrastructure programs would create millions of jobs, clean energy investment would create millions of jobs, strengthening small businesses would create jobs. Oddly enough, except for infrastructure spending, these are not programs that Trump has supported.

Edit: It’s important to note that achieving 3.5%-4% growth in a developed economy isn’t impossible but in order to do so you need not only jobs, but people. We currently don’t have enough people to achieve that growth. The good news is that there is a way to get the people we need in order to fill these jobs–through immigration, something that the GOP wants to severely limit.