The Millenial Consumer

Millenials have been driving advertisers crazy. We don’t respond to ads like other generations have. Instead, we respond to how well a company embraces our values: sustainability, advancing social issues, knowing where our food and products come from, etc. This suggests that instead of brands driving consumer tastes, Millenials are pushing brands to make smarter decisions and better choices.

In a 2012 study of American and British adults, 8 in 10 millennials said they appreciated “behind the scenes” commercials for their food, like Whole Foods Market’s Values Matter campaign, which links back to a page where the readers can verify the company’s sustainability claims personally. By comparison, only 6.5 in 10 baby boomers indicated that they wanted more information about their food from brands.

Obama donated over $1 million dollars while in office

Obama-charity-giving

Well, this is pretty incredible. Wonder how much Trump is going to donate? I mean actually donate, not made up donations.

The biggest recipient was the Fisher House Foundation, which supports families of veterans and received $392,000 from the former commander in chief from 2009 to 2015. That money appears to have come from sales of Obama’s children’s book Of Thee I Sing. Just before entering the White House, Obama finished a manuscript for the book, which he published with Random House. Obama pledged to donate all of his post-tax proceeds from the book to the Fisher House Foundation to support a scholarship fund for children of wounded and fallen soldiers.

Jokes aside, I think donating to charity should be an important part of everyone’s life if they can afford to do so. $5 counts. If you can’t donate money, donate time.

Some of my favorite places to donate to:

  • DonorsChoose – Help teachers in communities that need it. You can help them buy classroom supplies or fund special projects for their students.
  • Watsi – Help fund healthcare for individuals around the world.

In addition, I think donating to the ACLU, CAIR, and Planned Parenthood are all worthy as well considering the current events going on.

You can use VolunteerMatch to find opportunities to volunteer your time if you can’t donate money.

I Work from Home

I Work from Home by Colin Nissan

OPERATOR: And when’s the last time you saw someone else? Was that today?

ROBERT: Uh, my wife . . . this morning, I guess.

OPERATOR: Anyone else?

ROBERT: I don’t think so. Well, the mailman, but that was through the blinds. I don’t know if that counts.

OPERATOR: I’m afraid not. (Pause.) I’m going to ask you to open the blinds, O.K.? Let’s go ahead and let some light in.

ROBERT: How much light??

OPERATOR: Just a little is fine.

ROBERT: O.K. (Pause.) I did it. (Pause.) It’s bright. It feels so bright on my face.

I’ve been working from home for almost two years now and I can honestly tell you that there are days, weeks even, that are similar.

I recently had a conversation with a colleague that works in one of our offices and she lamented how she wished she could work from home more. I advised against it since I often feel like a hermit and miss the socialization that an office setting gives you. The Oatmeal explains why working from home is both awesome and horrible.

Working from home means you get a lot of freedom in how you dress, how you eat, how many bathroom breaks you can take, and how and where to work but trying to stay motivated to work when there are so many distractions is rough. It takes a lot of discipline and the ability to focus, which on a lot of days I don’t have.